Tag Archives: Kano

Market Men and Women Association in Lagos orders markets shut in Chibok protest

The Market Men and Women Association ordered several big Lagos markets to shut down yesterday to protest the abduction of the Chibok girls.

Though not noted in the article, Lagos traders have been affected by insecurity in the North. Traders from Chad and Niger used to travel to northern cities like Kano to buy cloth, clothes from China, electronics, etc. The Kano wholesale/retailers in turn traveled to Lagos to supply their shops. Because of insecurity in the North, now, traders from neighboring countries don’t travel to Kano, and Lagos traders have thus lost some of their biggest customers, the Kano-based wholesale/retailers.

Bayero University attacked

Nigeria: Multiple explosions, gunfire reported in university campus in Kano
At least three explosions, followed by an exchange of gunfire, were reported on 29 April in an old section of the Bayero University campus in the northern city of Kano (Kano state). In addition, an unconfirmed source claims that eight people were killed in the blasts. Details of the attacks are still emerging.

Nigeria: Multiple explosions, gunfire reported in university campus in Kano

At least three explosions, followed by an exchange of gunfire, were reported on 29 April in an old section of the Bayero University campus in the northern city of Kano (Kano state). In addition, an unconfirmed source claims that eight people were killed in the blasts. Details of the attacks are still emerging.

From a Control Risks/International SOS email. Bayero University is where I lived last summer, and studied Hausa two summers ago. It is one of the few public spaces in Kano where one can meet Hausa Nigerian women.  This is really sad.

If the White man really wanted to destroy us…

This is a quote from a barber in Kano in 2005.  He let his children be vaccinated for polio at a time when many refused because of suspicion that the West was using the vaccine would cause infertility or HIV among Muslims.
If the White man really wanted to destroy us, there are many other easier ways to do it. They can poison our coca-cola, the biscuits we buy, the sweets and even panadol that you can buy in the kiosks for headaches.
From a great article by Maryam Yahya, “Polio Vaccines – “No Thank You!” Barriers to Polio Eradication in Northern Nigeria” in a 2007 African Affairs issue.

This is a quote from a barber in Kano in 2005.  He let his children be vaccinated for polio at a time when many refused because of suspicion that the West was using the vaccine would cause infertility or HIV among Muslims.

If the White man really wanted to destroy us, there are many other easier ways to do it. They can poison our coca-cola, the biscuits we buy, the sweets and even panadol that you can buy in the kiosks for headaches.

From a great article by Maryam Yahya, “Polio Vaccines – “No Thank You!” Barriers to Polio Eradication in Northern Nigeria” in a 2007 African Affairs issue.

“It was not an emergency landing.”

A Maxair plane carrying 500 pilgrims from Saudia Arabia back to Nigeria crash landed in Kano.  Everyone survived.

[A] Media Consultant to the airline…confirmed the incident in a telephone interview with Vanguard, saying, ‘’It was not an emergency landing. The aircraft lost four tyres while landing at the airport but I want to make it very clear that it was not an emergency landing as being speculated in some quarters.”

An excerpt from the comments in response to the article–the commenter is trying to make the point that this incident should not be attributed to the devil.

this happens everywhere…unforeseen that is why its called an accident…

Perhaps most interesting: Maxair appears to be a Wisconsin-based company.  (Unless there is another Maxair?) So maybe this should not be seen as another Scary Nigerian Flight Story.

“These things, they don’t affect people like you.”

I was talking with a Christian woman who has lived in Kano for more than 20 years.  She told me about the recent post-election riots in Kano.  The area where she works is mostly Muslim, but has a sizable Christian community.  The rioters tried to get into this area, but couldn’t get past the guards.

“These things, they don’t affect people like you, but they affect people like me,” she told me.  She is leaving Kano for good in December and returning to her home in south west Nigeria.

The dye pits

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A friend and I visited one of Kano’s few tourist attractions: the dye pits.  An old man sat in front of a deep pit dying cloth, while a few feet away men pounded the cloth to “iron” it and make it shine.  See my attempt at this above.

My friend asked our guide if people ever fell into the empty dye pits.  ”All the time,” our guide responded, very seriously.

We were asked to sign a visitor book before we left.  They hadn’t had a visitor in 6 days.

Interview with my Hausa teach in Kano

I studied Hausa this summer at the Centre for the Study of Nigerian Languages at Bayero University, Kano.  I had two fantastic language instructors.  One of them, Tijani Almajir, allowed me to interview him about the Centre, his own background, and learning Hausa.  Here’s the edited interview.  (The quality is not as high as it could be because I wanted it to load somewhat quickly in places with slow internet.)